The Rubinstein Law Firm Logo

For Legal Help, Call
248-220-1415

COVID-19 ANNOUNCEMENT: The Rubinstein Law Firm is dedicated to helping you with your legal needs during these challenging times. We can meet with you virtually (Skype, FaceTime, etc.), or by telephone.

The Rubinstein Law Firm Logo

For Legal Help, Call
248-220-1415

COVID-19 ANNOUNCEMENT: The Rubinstein Law Firm is dedicated to helping you with your legal needs during these challenging times. We can meet with you virtually (Skype, FaceTime, etc.), or by telephone.

Virtual visitation may become standard in divorce settlements

On Behalf of | Jun 9, 2020 | Family Law

Now more than ever, the technologies available for staying in contact with loved ones are indispensable. Not only can people stay connected during these strange times, but parents can stay in contact with their children.

In fact, the concept of virtual visitation could gain traction here in Michigan and across the country and become a standard part of divorce settlements.

Not all states have laws making virtual visitation a viable option, but that does not mean parents cannot put it into their parenting plans on their own. Staying in contact with the children despite not being with them physically can be a vitally important part of the parent-child relationship. Having daily contact can help ease children through the transition that comes with a divorce. It can also help keep those relationships strong.

Examples of virtual arrangements

Parents can agree to allow each other to have FaceTime or Skype calls with the children when they are in the physical custody of the other parent. They can agree to allow for this time at some point and to let the children have uninterrupted and unsupervised time with the other parent this way. Parents can help with homework, talk about their days and otherwise keep up with the children’s activities, feelings and more.

Even if a Michigan court cannot order virtual visitation during the divorce process, the parents can include it in any agreement they come to on their own. Through the use of negotiations and mediation, the parties have the opportunity to think outside the box and include provisions they believe will best benefit their families.

Working this into any viable parenting plan could help not only the children, but the parents who miss them as well.

Share This